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Bibliography

A complete list of research credits for the Lasting Marriage Health Program.

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Bibliography
In total, we used 126 different research studies and related works in the creation of our app-based program, and it continues to evolve with the latest and greatest findings. Here they are, in order of appearance in the program:
 

  1. Driver, J.L. & Gottman, J.M. (2004). Daily marital interactions and positive affect during marital conflict among newlywed couples. Family process, 43 (3), 301-314.
     
  2. Feeney, B.C., Lemay, Jr., E.P. (2012). Surviving relationship threats: The role of emotional capital. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Vol 38, Issue 8, pp. 1004 - 1017.
     
  3. Walsh, C.M., Neff, L.A., Gleason, M.E.J. (2017). The Role of Emotional Capital During the Early Years of Marriage: Why Everyday Moments Matter. Journal of Family Psychology. 31 (4), 513-519. 
     
  4. Huston, T.L., Caughlin, J.P., Houts, R.M., Smith, S.E., George, L.J. (2001). The connubial crucible: newlywed years as predictors of marital delight, distress, and divorce. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2001 Feb; 80 (2),: 237-52.

     
  5. Johnson, S. M. and Greenman, P. S. (2006), The path to a secure bond: Emotionally focused couple therapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62: 597–609.
     
  6. Johnson, S. M. and Whiffen, V. E. (1999), Made to Measure: Adapting Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy to Partners' Attachment Styles. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 6: 366–381.
     
  7. Wiebe, S. A., Johnson, S. M., Burgess Moser, M., Dalgleish, T. L., Tasca, G. A. (2017). Predicting follow-up outcomes in emotionally focused couple therapy: The role of change in trust, relationship-specific attachment, and emotional engagement. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 43, 213–226.
     
  8. Johnson, S. M., Hunsley, J., Greenberg, L. and Schindler, D. (1999), Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy: Status and Challenges. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 6: 67–79.
     
  9. Weiss, R. L. (1980). Strategic behavioral relationship therapy: Toward a model for assessment and intervention. In J.P. Vincent (Ed.), Advances in family intervention, assessment, and theory Vol. 1 (pp. 229-271). Greenwich, CT: JAI Process.
     
  10. Hawkins, M. W., Carrère, S. and Gottman, J. M. (2002), Marital Sentiment Override: Does It Influence Couples' Perceptions?. Journal of Marriage and Family, 64: 193–201.
     
  11. Notarius, C. I., Benson, P.R., Sloane, D. Vanzetti, N.A., & Hornyak, L.M. (1989). Exploring the interface between perception and behavior: An analysis of marital interaction in distressed and nondistressed couples. Behavioral Assessment, 11, 39-64.
     
  12. Hazan C, Shaver, P. Romantic love conceptualized as an attachment process. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1987 Mar; 52(3):511-24.
     
  13. Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss: Vol. 1: Attachment. New York: Basic Books.
     
  14. Wieselquist J., Rusbult, C.E., Foster, C.A., & Agnew, C.R. (1999).  Commitment, pro-relationship behavior, and trust in close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 77(5):942-66.
     
  15. Gottman, J.M, & Levenson, R.W. (1992). Marital processes predictive of later dissolution: Behavior, physiology and health. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 221-233.
     
  16. Stafford, L., Dainton, M., & Haas, S. (2000). Measuring routine and strategic relational maintenance: Scale revision, sex versus gender roles, and the prediction of relational characteristics. Communication Monographs, 3, 306–323.
     
  17. Egbert, N., & Polk, D. (2006). Speaking the language of relational maintenance: A validity test of Chapman’s (1992) five love languages. Communication Research Reports, 23, 1-8.
     
  18. Giedd J.N., Lalonde, F.M., Celano, M.J., et al. (2009) Anatomical Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Typically Developing Children and Adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 48(5):465-470.
     
  19. Tierney A.L., Nelson, C.A. (2009). Brain Development and the Role of Experience in the Early Years. Zero to three. 30(2):9-13.
     
  20. Fuchs, E., & Flügge, G. (2014). Adult neuroplasticity: more than 40 years of research. Neural Plasticity.
     
  21. Askenasy, J. & Lehmann, J. (2013) Consciousness, brain, neuroplasticity. Frontiers in Psychology. 4:412.
     
  22. Davidson, R.J., McEwen, B.S. (2012). Social influences on neuroplasticity: Stress and interventions to promote well-being. Nature neuroscience. 15(5):689-695.
     
  23. Beckes L., IJzerman H., & Tops, M. (2015). Toward a radically embodied neuroscience of attachment and relationships. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 9:266.
     
  24. Verhofstadt, L.L., Buysse,  A., Ickes, W., Davis, M, &Devoldre, I. (2008). Support provision in marriage: The role of emotional similarity and empathic accuracy. Emotion, Vol 8(6), Dec 2008, 792-802.
     
  25. Verhofstadt, L.L., Buysse,  A., et al. The Role of Cognitive and Affective Empathy in Spouses’ Support Interactions: An Observational Study. Lahvis GP, ed. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0149944.
     
  26. Shapiro, Alyson Fearnley; Gottman, John M.; Carrére, Sybil (2000). The baby and the marriage: Identifying factors that buffer against decline in marital satisfaction after the first baby arrives. Journal of Family Psychology, Vol 14(1), 59-70.
     
  27. Babcock, Julia C.; Gottman, John M.; Ryan, Kimberly D.; Gottman, Julie S. (2013). A component analysis of a brief psycho‐educational couples’ workshop: One‐year follow-up results. Journal of Family Therapy, Vol 35(3), 252-280.
     
  28. Acitelli L.K., Douvan E, Veroff J. Perceptions of conflict in the first year of marriage: How important are similarity and understanding? Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 1993;10:5–19.
     
  29. Seider B.H., Hirschberger G., Nelson K.L., Levenson R.W. (2009). We can work it out: age differences in relational pronouns, physiology, and behavior in marital conflict. The Journal of Psychology and Aging. 2009 Sept. 24 (3), 604-13.
     
  30. Wieselquist J., Rusbult, C.E., Foster, C.A., & Agnew, C.R. (1999). Commitment, pro-relationship behavior, and trust in close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 77(5):942-66.
     
  31. Stanley S.M., Whitton S.W., Sadberry, S.L., Clements M.L., Markman, H.J. Sacrifice as a predictor of marital outcomes. Family Process. 2006 Sep; 45(3):289-303.
     
  32. Fincham, F.D., Stanley, S.M., Beach, S.R.H. (2007). Transformative processes in marriage: An analysis of emerging trends. Journal of marriage and the family. 69(2):275-292. 
     
  33. Wieselquist, J. Interpersonal forgiveness, trust, and the investment model of commitment  Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. Vol 26, Issue 4, pp. 531 - 548.
     
  34. Rafaeli, E. and Gleason, M. E. J. (2009), Skilled Support Within Intimate Relationships. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 1: 20–37.
     
  35. Verhofstadt L, Devoldre I, Buysse A, et al. The Role of Cognitive and Affective Empathy in Spouses’ Support Interactions: An Observational Study. Lahvis GP, ed. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0149944.
     
  36. Pasch, Lauri A.; Bradbury, Thomas N. Social support, conflict, and the development of marital dysfunction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 66(2), Apr 1998, 219-230.
     
  37. Fenell, D. Characteristics of long-term first marriages. Journal of Mental Health Counseling. 1993;15:446–460.
     
  38. Casasanto D., Lupyan G. (2015). “All concepts are ad hoc concepts,” in The Conceptual Mind: New Directions in the Study of Concepts eds Margolis E., Laurence S., editors. (Cambridge: MIT Press; ) 543–566.
     
  39. Kominsky, J.F., Keil, F.C. (2014). Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect. Cognitive science. 38(8):1604-1633.
     
  40. Dawson, G. (1994). Development of emotional expression and emotion regulation in infancy: Contributions of the frontal lobe. In G. Dawson & K.W. Fischer (Eds.), Human behavior and the developing brain (pp. 346-379). New York: Guilford.
     
  41. Davidson, R.J. (1994b). Asymmetric brain function, affective style, and psychopathology: The role of early experience and plasticity. Development and Psychopathology, 6, 741-758.
     
  42. Gianino, A., & Tronick, E.Z. (1988). The mutual regulation model: the infant’s self and interactive regulation and coping and defensive capacities. In T.M. Field, P.M. McCabe, & N. Schneiderman (Eds.), Stress and coping across development (pp. 47-70). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
     
  43. Tierney AL, Nelson CA. Brain Development and the Role of Experience in the Early Years. Zero to three. 2009;30(2):9-13.
     
  44. Baumeister RF, Leary MR. The need to belong: desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. Psychol Bull. 1995 May; 117(3):497-529.
     
  45. Beckes L, IJzerman H, Tops M. Toward a radically embodied neuroscience of attachment and relationships. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2015;9:266.
     
  46. Waters SF, Virmani EA, Thompson RA, Meyer S, Raikes HA, Jochem R. Emotion Regulation and Attachment: Unpacking Two Constructs and Their Association. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment. 2010;32(1):37-47.
     
  47. Farley, J.P. & Kim-Spoon, J. The Development of Adolescent Self-Regulation: Reviewing the Role of Parent, Peer, Friend, and Romantic Relationships. Journal of adolescence. 2014;37(4):433-440.
     
  48. Frith, U. & Frith, C. The social brain: allowing humans to boldly go where no other species has been. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 2010 365 165-176; DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2009.0160. Published 24 November 2009.
     
  49. Yu, T., Pettit, G,S., Lansford, J.E., Dodge, K.A., Bates, J.E. The Interactive Effects of Marital Conflict and Divorce on Parent-Adult Children’s Relationships. Journal of marriage and the family. 2010;72(2):282-292.
     
  50. Yoshimoto, D.K. (2005). Marital meta-emotion, emotion coaching, and dyadic interaction. Dissertation Abstracts International, Section B; The Sciences and Engineering, p. 3448.
     
  51. Waters, S.F., Virmani, E.A., Thompson, R.A., Meyer, S., Raikes, H.A., Jochem, R. Emotion Regulation and Attachment: Unpacking Two Constructs and Their Association. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment. 2010;32(1):37-47.
     
  52. Masood, A.; Mazahir, S. Relational Communication, Emotional Intelligence, and Marital Satisfacion. International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology 4:4. June 2015.
     
  53. Hendrix, H. (1990). Getting the love you want: A guide for couples. New York: Perennial Library.
     
  54. Sened, H., Lavidor, M., Lazarus, G., Bar-Kalifa, E., Rafaeli, E., & Ickes, W. (2017). Empathic Accuracy and Relationship Satisfaction: A Meta-Analytic Review. Journal of Family Psychology.
     
  55. Winczewski, L.A., Bowen, J.D., & Collins, N.L. (2016). Is Empathic Accuracy Enough to Facilitate Responsive Behavior in Dyadic Interaction? Distinguishing Ability From Motivation. Psychological Science. 27(3):394-404.
     
  56. Gottman, J.M.; Krokoff, L.J. Marital interaction and satisfaction: A longitudinal view. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 57(1), Feb 1989, 47-52.
     
  57. Birditt, K.S., Brown, E., Orbuch, T.L., McIlvane, J.M. Marital Conflict Behaviors and Implications for Divorce over 16 Years. Journal of marriage and the family. 2010;72(5):1188-1204.  
     
  58. Pasch, Lauri A.; Bradbury, Thomas N. Social support, conflict, and the development of marital dysfunction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 66(2), Apr 1998, 219-230.
     
  59. Carrere, S., & Gottman, J. M. (1999). Predicting divorce among newlyweds from the first three minutes of a marital conflict discussion. Family Process, 38(3), 293-301.
     
  60. Gottman J.M., Levenson, R.W. A two-factor model for predicting when a couple will divorce: exploratory analyses using 14-year longitudinal data. Family Process. 41: 83-96.
     
  61. Gottman, J.M., Coan, J., Carrere, S., Swanson, C. Predicting marital happiness and stability from newlywed interactions. Journal of Marriage and the Family. 1998;60:5–22.
     
  62. Graham, J.E., Glaser, R., Loving, T.J., Malarkey, W.B., Stowell, J.R., Kiecolt-Glaser, J.K.. Cognitive Word Use During Marital Conflict and Increases in Proinflammatory Cytokines. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association. 2009;28(5):621-630.
     
  63. Levenson, R.W., & Gottman, J.M. (1985). Physiological and affective predictors of change in relationship satisfaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 85-94.
     
  64. Gottman, J.M., (1993). The roles of conflict engagement, escalation or avoidance in marital interaction: A longitudinal view of five types of couples. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 61 (1), 6-15.
     
  65. Karney BR, Bradbury TN. The longitudinal course of marital quality and stability: a review of theory, method, and research. Psychol Bull. 1995 Jul; 118(1):3-34.
     
  66. Matthews LS, Wickrama KAS, Conger RD. Predicting marital instability from spouse and observer reports of marital interaction. Journal of Marriage and the Family. 1996;58:641–655.
     
  67. Fincham, F.D. Marital conflict: Correlates, structure, and context. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 2003;12:23–27.
     
  68. Oggins J. Topics of marital disagreement among African-American and Euro-American newlyweds. Psychol Rep. 2003 Apr; 92(2):419-25.
     
  69. Papp LM, Cummings EM, Goeke-Morey MC. For Richer, for Poorer: Money as a Topic of Marital Conflict in the Home. Family relations. 2009;58(1):91-103.
     
  70. Ekman, P. (1984). Expression and the nature of emotion. In K.R. Schere & P. Ekman (Eds.), Approaches to emotion (pp. 319-344). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
     
  71. Kiecolt-Glaser, J.K., Loving, T.J., Stowell, J.R., Malarkey, W. B., Lemeshow, S., Dickinson, S.L., & Glaser, R. (2005). Hostile marital interactions, proinflammatory cytokine production, and wound healing. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62, 1377-1384.
     
  72. Kiecolt-Glaser, J.k., Bane, C., Glaser, R., & Malarkey, W.B. (2003). Love, marriage, and divorce: Newlyweds’ stress hormones foreshadow relationship changes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 176-188.
     
  73. Gottman, J.M. (1993). A theory of marital dissolution and stability. Journal of Family Psychology, 7 (1), 57-75.
     
  74. Bruce S. McEwen. Physiology and neurobiology of stress and adaptation: central role of the brain. Physiological Reviews Published 1 July 2007 Vol. 87 no. 3, 873-904.
     
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  76. Gottman, J. M. and Levenson, R. W. (1999), How Stable Is Marital Interaction Over Time?. Family Process, 38: 159–165.
     
  77. Carstensen, L. L., Gottman, J. M., & Levenson, R. W. (1995). Emotional behavior in long-term marriage . Psychology and Aging, 10, 140–149.
     
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  79. Cupach, W. R., & Metts, S. (1986). Accounts of relational dissolution: A comparison of marital and non-marital relationships. Communication Monographs, 53, 311-334.
     
  80. Cupach, W. R., & Metts, S. (1995). The role of sexual attitude similarity on romantic heterosexual relationships. Personal Relationships, 2, 287-300.
     
  81. Grewen, K.M., Anderson, B.J., Girdler, S.S., & Light, K.C. (2003). Warm partner contact is related to lower cardiovascular reactivity. Behavioral Medicine. 29(3):123-30.
     
  82. Field, T. (2010). Pregnancy and labor massage. Expert review of obstetrics & gynecology. 5(2):177-181.
     
  83. Hertenstein, M.J., Keltner, D., App, B., Bulleit, B.A., & Jaskolka, A.R. (2006). Touch communicates distinct emotions. Emotion. 6(3):528-33.
     
  84. Johnson, S. and Zuccarini, D. (2010), Integrating Sex and Attachment in Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 36: 431–445.
     
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  96. Gordon, Amie M.; Impett, Emily A.; Kogan, Aleksandr; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher. To have and to hold: Gratitude promotes relationship maintenance in intimate bonds. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 103(2), Aug 2012, 257-274.
     
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